Wednesday, March 25, 2015

South Carolina Historical Marker #10-65

While we were exploring Charleston, I stopped at a number of South Carolina historical markers, including: The Siege of Charleston, 1780 [#10-65] and Jonathan Jasper Wright Law Office [#10-82].

The Siege of Charleston, 1780
South Carolina Historical Marker #10-65

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This marker is located on King Street, at the northwest corner of Marion Square near Hutson Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The GPS coordinates for this location are N 32° 47.207 W 079° 56.209.

You can log your visit to this landmark at waymark.com.

IMG_7827-001

The British capture of Charleston in May 1780 was one of the worst American defeats of the Revolution. On March 30-31 Gen. Henry Clinton’s British, Hessian, and Loyalist force crossed the Ashley River north of Charleston. On April 1 Clinton advanced against the American lines near this site, held by Gen. Benjamin Lincoln’s Continentals and militia. The 42-day siege would be the longest of the war.


South Carolina Historical Marker #10-65


As Gen. Charles Cornwallis closed off Lincoln’s escape routes on the Cooper River, Clinton advanced his siege lines and bombarded Charleston. On May 12, 1780, in front of the American works near this spot, Lincoln surrendered the city and his force of 6,000 men, after what one British officer called “a gallant defense.” The British occupied Charleston for more than 2 1/2 years, evacuating Dec. 14, 1782.

South Carolina Historical Marker #10-65

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

To Healdsburg

Working out of St. Helena, I headed to Healdsburg after work on Monday afternoon. I caught up with Tomasin at John and Zeke's. Walking into the place, we ran into Chris.

Eventually, we headed to Tomasin's house in Windsor. Tomasin, Julie, Mikey, Chris and I finished the night having take-out mexican food and watching the Warriors blow out the Wizards.

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Faded

The complete list of Starbucks iTunes picks of the week is here!

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Faded

Code Expiration: June 16, 2015

Monday, March 23, 2015

Future Stars

On Sunday afternoon, Jack, Sharon and I spent an hour at Future Stars with Scott Hamilton. Future Stars is a college counseling center designed to guide families through the college admissions process. This is our fifth session [9/9/2013, 1/14/2014, 9/24/2014, 1/25/2015].

The session focused on developing a potential list of colleges. We walked through a list of more than 300 colleges in the United States. Based on Jack's feedback to a survey about the characteristics that he is looking for in a college, we cut the list down to 31 colleges. Jack will be working with Scott in April to start researching these colleges and further refine the list. We are already starting to plan a couple of trips to visit colleges.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

2015 Jesuit PACE Gala & Auction


Saturday night, Sharon and I went to the Jesuit Red & Gold Gala. This is the third year that we have gone [2013, 2014]. The event includes a silent auction, a dinner and a live auction.

We ended up at an odd table; we were with a group of sophomore class parents right in front of the jazz band... We had Jack take us and pick us up.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Yule's Birthday Party

Saturday afternoon, Sharon and I made a quick trip out to the Hunter Stallion Station. Hunter was throwing a party birthday for Yuli. We got a chance to catch up with Hunter, Robbie and Lauren and take a quick peek at the pig they were cooking. Unfortunately, we couldn't stay long; we headed back to Carmichael to get ready for the Jesuit Red and Gold Gala dinner and auction.

Cooking a pig for Yuli's birthday party

Friday, March 20, 2015

South Carolina Historical Marker #10-82

While we were exploring Charleston, I stopped at a number of South Carolina historical markers, including: The Siege of Charleston, 1780 [#10-65] and Jonathan Jasper Wright Law Office [#10-82].

Jonathan Jasper Wright Law Office
South Carolina Historical Marker #10-82

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This marker is located at 84 Queen Street, Charleston, South Carolina. The GPS coordinates for this location are N 32° 46.674 W 079° 55.953.

You can log your visit to this landmark at waymark.com.

South Carolina Historical Marker #10-82


Jonathan Jasper Wright (1840-1885), the first African American in the U.S. to sit as a justice on a state supreme court, practiced law here from 1877 until his death in 1885. Wright, a native of Pa., was educated at Lancasterian Academy in Ithaca, N.Y. He came to S.C. in 1865 as a teacher for the American Missionary Association and also worked as an attorney for the Freedmen’s Bureau.

South Carolina Historical Marker #10-82


Wright wrote that he hoped to “vindicate the cause of the downtrodden.” He was a delegate to the S.C. constitutional convention of 1868 and a state senator 1868-70. Wright, elected to the S.C. Supreme Court in 1870, resigned in 1877 due to political pressure. After he left the bench he practiced law, helped Claflin College found its Law Department, and became its Chair in Law. He died of tuberculosis in 1885.

South Carolina Historical Landmark #10-82

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Milo Greene at 2015 SXSW

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

California Historical Landmark #939

Working out of St. Helena in January, February and March, I have started exploring California Historical Landmarks in Napa and Lake Counties, including: Lower Lake Stone Jail [#429], Stone House [#450], Old Bull Trail Road and St Helena Toll Road [#467], Chiles Grist Mill [#547] and Litto's Hubcap Ranch [#939].

Litto's Hubcap Ranch
California State Historical Landmark #939

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This landmark is located at 654 Pope Valley Road, 2.1 miles northwest of Pope Valley, California. There are 16 other California State Historical Landmarks in Napa County. The GPS coordinates for this location are N 38° 38.197 W 122° 27.189.

You can log your site to this site at waymarking.com!

California Historical Landmark #939

This is one of California's exceptional Twentieth Century Folk Art Environments. Over a period of 30 years, Emanuele 'Litto' Damonte (1896-1985), with the help of his neighbors, collected more than 2,000 hubcaps. All around Hubcap Ranch are constructions and arrangements of hubcaps, bottles, and pulltops which proclaim that 'Litto, the Pope Valley Hubcap King,' was here.

California Historical Landmark #939

California Historical Landmark #939

California Historical Landmark #939

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

ESPN 30 for 30 Shorts: The Billion Dollar Game

NOTE: Pete Carill spent a number of years as an assistant coach for the Kings. There is a picture of Jack with Coach Carill here.

Grantland and ESPN Films have released the thirty-first film in their 30 for 30 documentary short series.

30 for 30 Shorts: The Billion Dollar Game

The latest film, from Nick Guthe, looks at the 1989 NCAA tournament basketball game between #1 seed Georgetown Hoyas and the Ivy League champion and #16 seed Princeton. Led by coach Pete Carill, Princeton looked to upset Georgetown. The game would change March Madness as we know it.


You can find The Billion Dollar Game on the ESPN web site at http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=12455166 .

More about the film at: http://espn.go.com/30for30/film?page=thebilliondollargame.

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Sago Mini Space Explorer

The complete list of Starbucks iTunes picks of the week is here!

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Sago Mini Space Explorer

Code Expiration: June 9, 2015

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Asleep at the Wheel - The Girl I Left Behind Me

The complete list of Starbucks iTunes picks of the week is here!

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Asleep at the Wheel - The Girl I Left Behind Me

Code Expiration: June 9, 2015

Monday, March 16, 2015

2015 Charleston Day 4

Sharon started her conference on Monday afternoon, while I traveled back to Sacramento at the end of the day.

After a quick breakfast at Starbucks, we headed out. The first stop was the Charleston Museum. The Charleston Museum is billed as the oldest museum in the United States. It was founded in 1773 and opened to the public in 1824. We did a quick walkthrough.

The tour guide talked on Saturday about how South Carolina was a major rice growing state. Both Sharon and I were surprised by this fact. Apparently, for almost the first 190 years of rice production in the US, the principal producers were South Carolina and Georgia. The museum had several exhibits highlighted rice growing in the state's early history.

From the museum, Sharon and I walked around the corner to the Aiken-Rhett House Museum. We did a 45 minute audio tour. This house was a little different. Rather than working to restore the house to its original condition, the house shows the changes and wear of its 200 year history.

Sharon didn't like the tour. She felt like it was not safe and that the slave quarters and the house were going to collapse underneath her!

Taking a route that we had walk before, we headed to Blossoms for lunch. Sharon had a Jumbo Lump Crab Tostada Salad, while I had Lump Crab & Fried Green Tomato BLT.

Back at the hotel, Sharon went to the opening of her conference, while I packed. About 2:00 pm, I caught a taxi to the airport. I took a 4:40 pm flight from Charleston to Chicago and then a 7:00 pm flight from Chicago to Sacramento. We landed in Sacramento about 9:45 pm. By the time I collected my luggage and drove home, it was 10:45 pm.

I would go back to Charleston…

Sunday, March 15, 2015

2015 Charleston Day 3

UntitledUp earlier than previous mornings, we had breakfast at the hotel. Afterwards, we walked to the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist for a 9:30 am Mass.

We had two plans for the day. First, we had to change rooms. We had an upgraded room for the first two nights on the concierge floor, but we needed to switch to one of the rooms in the block that has been reserved for Sharon's meeting. When we got back from Mass, we stopped at the front desk and they actually had a room ready for us. We packed up our stuff and moved. Although a little smaller, this room had a cool view of King Street.

Second, we planned to visit Fort Sumter. After we got settled, we walked down King Street and Calhoun Street to the ticket office for the Fort Sumter tours. We ran into two problems. First, the next tour started a little later than I thought. Second, there was no place nearby for lunch.

After buying tickets, we walked back towards King Street. We ended up having a great lunch in the bar at Jean de Rue. We had a very sociable bartender from Boston.

We wandered back to the dock after lunch. We caught the boat out to Fort Sumter. It was a great afternoon with temperatures in the low 70s. The ride out on the boat had some great views of Charleston and the Cooper River Bridge. Once at the fort, we listened to a ranger presentation for about 10 minutes before spending the rest of the hour exploring the fort. During the ride back from the fort, there was a lone dolphin swimming in the front of the boat.

Back at the dock, we walked to the Bar at Husk. After a drink and some taunting text messages to the Gainsleys, we headed back to the hotel to get cleaned up for dinner.

We finished the night with dinner at the Peninsula Grill. The food was good, but the staff was odd. Both the waiter and the sommelier seemed more than a little hyperactive. We started with oysters and a wedge salad and had sea scallops and rack of lamb as main courses.

Fort_Sumter

Saturday, March 14, 2015

2015 Charleston Day 2

After breakfast at the hotel, we wandered down to the Mills House Hotel. The plan for the morning was a walking tour of the city. Working with the hotel concierge on Friday night, we had booked a walking tour. The tour that the concierge recommended was actually full so we ended up with Charleston Strolls. This turned out to be fortuitous; we were the only two people on the tour!

We got a great two hour private tour of the city. We covered the area of the old walled city. I was very impressed. Charleston was founded here in 1680. For comparison, New Orleans was settled in 1718; we spend a long weekend in New Orleans last year.

After the tour, we grabbed lunch at the bar at High Cotton. We split a Grilled Chicken Salad and Fried Oysters Florentine.

Wandering back up Market Street, we headed to the Nathaniel Russell House. Built in 1809 for $80,000, the house is widely recognized as one of America's most important Neoclassical houses and features three important geometric designs: a front rectangular room, a center oval room, and a square room in the rear. The house also includes a three story elliptical spiral staircase. We took a guided tour of the house.

Heading back to the hotel, we had a leisurely late afternoon at hotel. I hung out in concierge lounge and worked on a status report.

After a drink in the Thoroughbred Club, we ended the night with a late dinner at the Charleston Grill in the hotel. We had Seared Foie Gras and Charleston Grill Crab Cake as appetizers and Braised Pork Shank and Seared Flounder as entrees.

Friday, March 13, 2015

2015 Charleston Day 1

Sharon and I caught a 12:30 am United flight from Sacramento to Houston, Texas. Waiting for the flight to board, we sat down next to Kyle, a friend of Drew's and Morgan's. We had seen Kyle at Drew's birthday party in November.

Arriving at Houston at 6:00 am, we had a longest walk to the terminal for the regional jets. We boarded a small regional jet (2 seats on one side and 1 on the other) to Charleston, South Carolina. The flight was supposed to leave at 7:20 am, but with the crew showing up late, it was more like 7:40 am before we took off. The flight got us to Charleston about 11:00 am.

By the time we collected our luggage and got a taxi to hotel, it was just after 12:00 pm. In a pleasant surprise, they actually had a room ready for us. We will be spending a couple of nights at the Belmond Charleston Place.

After dropping our bags in the room, we spent some time talking to the concierge about our plans for the next couple of days. Sharon had already made some reservations for dinner for the next three nights last weekend. We also got some tour information.

After some discussion, the concierge made us a lunch reservation at Magnolias. We split a great lunch of fried green tomatoes, down south egg roll and shellfish over grits.

After lunch, We wandered into Waterfront Park and out to the end of wharf. From there, we meandered through the oldest part of town back towards the hotel with a couple of art gallery stops.

Trying to recover from the red eye, we both took a couple hour nap. Getting cleaned up, we enjoyed the lounge on the concierge floor. Eventually, we walked to Coast Bar and Grill for dinner. We had a great meal of assorted Cerviches, Grouper and Yellow Fin Tuna.

After dinner, we wandered back up King Street to the hotel and crashed. I am looking forward to exploring the city over the next couple of days….

Thursday, March 12, 2015

To Charleston, South Carolina

Sharon and I are heading to Charleston, South Carolina for a few days. Sharon has a business conference starting there on Monday. Last year, the conference was in New Orleans and we ended up with a big group including the Gainsleys, Janie and Mary plus a bushel of Larkins. This year, it will be just Sharon and I.

Charleston is not the easiest place to get to… We debated for some time what flights to take and eventually decided to take a red eye. Leaving for the airport a little before 10:30 pm, we will be catching a 12:30 am flight to Houston and then a connection from Houston to Charleston. It is going to be a long night.

Milo Greene at The Sinclair in Boston

ESPN Films: It's Not Crazy, It's Sports - Being Mr. Met

Grant land and ESPN Films have released the fourth short film in their It's Not Crazy, It's Sports series. An episode guide is here.

It's Not Crazy, It's Sports: Being Mr. Met.

In Errol Morris’s fourth of six shorts for ESPN Films, we learn, through a former Mr. Met, what it’s like to be a mascot — to be beloved, but voiceless — and what happens to one’s identity when the time comes to take the suit off.


You can find It's Not Crazy, It's Sports: Being Mr. Met on the ESPN web site at http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=12394742 .

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

California Historical Landmark #547

Working out of St. Helena in January, February and March, I have started exploring California Historical Landmarks in Napa and Lake Counties, including: Lower Lake Stone Jail [#429], Stone House [#450], Old Bull Trail Road and St Helena Toll Road [#467], Chiles Grist Mill [#547] and Litto's Hubcap Ranch [#939].

Chiles Grist Mill
California State Historical Landmark #547

See this location on Yahoo Maps in Flickr
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This landmark is located on the southwest corner on hillside, Chiles and Pope Road and Lower Chiles Valley road, 3.6 miles north on Highway 128, St. Helena, California. There are 16 other California State Historical Landmarks in Napa County. The GPS coordinates for this location are N 38° 32.111 W 122° 20.239.

You can log your site to this site at waymarking.com!

California Historical Landmark #547

Joseph Ballinger Chiles, who first came to California in 1841, erected the mill on Rancho Catacula 1845-56. The first American flour mill in Northern California, it was still in use in the 1880s. Chiles served as a vice president of the Society of California Pioneers, 1850-53.

California Historical Landmark #547

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Spring IT Directors Workshop 2015 Day 2

I spent the day at day two of the Spring IT Directors Workshop. The agenda included: Morning Inspiration, Cerner-Q&A; Finance; the Corporation and IT; Future of Tech; Change; PACS; Physician Report; Engagement, and; Closing.

ESPN Films: It's Not Crazy, It's Sports - The Streaker

Grant land and ESPN Films have released the third short film in their It's Not Crazy, It's Sports series. An episode guide is here.

It's Not Crazy, It's Sports: The Streaker.

For more than 22 years, the eyes of the world have gazed upon Mark Roberts’s ass. Errol Morris’s third of six shorts for ESPN Films introduces us to the infamous streaker who has ran naked through the world’s most prestigious sporting events.


You can find It's Not Crazy, It's Sports: The Streaker on the ESPN web site at http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=12394742 .

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Will Butler - Anna

The complete list of Starbucks iTunes picks of the week is here!

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Will Butler - Anna

Code Expiration: June 2, 2015

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Swing Tale

The complete list of Starbucks iTunes picks of the week is here!

Starbucks iTunes Pick of the Week - Swing Tale

Code Expiration: June 2, 2015

Monday, March 09, 2015

Spring IT Directors Workshop 2015 Day 1

I spent the day at day one of the Spring IT Directors Workshop. The agenda included: Morning Inspiration; CIO Welcome; Let's Get Hitched; What Guides You? (Enterprise Heat Dashboards); Smart Room; Lean - A team's perspective; Future of Workforce Management; Maximizing New Hire Success; Population Health; Requests for IT and PMO - Resource Planning & Tracking.

It's Not Crazy, It's Sports Episode Guide

ESPN Films announced a new primetime special, It's Not Crazy, It's Sports, directed by Academy Award-winning director Errol Morris (The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara, Thin Blue Line, The Unknown Known) which will air Sunday, March 1 at 9 p.m. ET on ESPN. Evolving ESPN's long-running brand campaign of the same name, the special broadcast consists of six short films that explore the inspiring, dramatic and unexpected things in sports that capture the experience of being a fan.

1. The Subterranean Stadium
Welcome to the Subterranean Stadium, the basement of John DiCarlo’s home in Charlotte, New York, where he and his buddies and relatives have gathered for years to play electric football. In this beautiful, deeply personal film, Errol Morris not only makes the little players come alive, he also lets the men who manipulate them tell their own stories: the hot dog vendor, the ex-con, the Kodak company man, and the postal carrier who defies his own health problems to keep the “buzz, buzz, buzz” alive. Yes, they keep score, but, as DiCarlo says, “All that really counts is family and friends.”
2. The Heist
North Carolina basketball fans are well aware of the Jordan no. 23 jersey that hangs from the rafters of the Dean Dome. But there was a time — February 1998, to be exact — when it disappeared. In The Heist, Errol Morris gets a former Duke student to re-create the theft and subsequent discovery of the sacred object. Having cased the joint, the student and three accomplices figured out a way to snatch the jumbo jersey and escalate the traditional war of pranks between the Tar Heel and Blue Devil faithfuls. Their luck ran out, though, a few weeks later, when the jersey was recovered just before they were to reveal it at Duke’s Cameron Indoor Stadium. It’s a tale that illustrates the lengths to which college hoops fans will go to stick it to an archival.
3. The Streaker
If the name of Mark Roberts doesn’t ring a bell, his body might. He is the British man who has been interrupting events for more than 22 years, in more than 22 countries, by running naked through the proceedings: the Olympics, rugby and soccer matches, a dog show, and, most famously, Super Bowl XXXVIII, when he sneaked onto the field dressed as a ref and ended up getting tackled by players from the Patriots and Panthers. Roberts sits down with Errol Morris to, ahem, reveal his secrets and motivation — “I just want to give people something to smile about.” And he’s not done. He says he would like to be buried in a see-through coffin so that he can streak his own funeral.
4. Being Mr. Met
Mascots aren’t allowed to talk. But Errol Morris gets one of them to take us inside the head of one of baseball’s most iconic figures, Mr. Met. From 1994 to 1997, A.J. Mass entertained millions at Shea Stadium without saying a word, and he relives those years — the ecstasy, the agony, and the threat from the Secret Service not to approach President Clinton. He also brings a thoughtful perspective to the life of a mascot, who has to assume a different identity in order to please. “We all wear costumes to interact with people,” says Mass. “We wish to be somebody other than ourselves.”
5. Most Valuable Whatever
What would possess someone to pay $8,000 for Ty Cobb’s dentures? Or $5,300 for the toilet that the Toronto Maple Leafs sat on? Or $820 for the butt fumble jersey? Well, Errol Morris finds out in this film about collectors of unusual sports objects. In the case of the jersey worn by Mark Sanchez when he fumbled the ball after running into his own lineman, a Jets fan just wanted to make sure the memorabilia wouldn’t end up in the wrong hands — a New England sports bar.
6. Chrome
You can tell a lot about a horse by looking at the eye.” So says Steve Coburn, who talks to Errol Morris about California Chrome, the horse who nearly became the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years during the 2014 campaign. Coburn tells the story of why he chose to buy the mare who birthed Chrome, how he and co-owner Perry Martin came to call their syndicate Dumbass Partners, and why he lost it when the horse finished out of the money in the Belmont. By looking into Coburn’s eyes, you’ll see why we love horses.

Sunday, March 08, 2015

ESPN Films: It's Not Crazy, It's Sports - The Heist

Grantland and ESPN Films have released the second short film in their It's Not Crazy, It's Sports series.

It's Not Crazy, It's Sports: The Heist.

A Duke zealot recounts the night Michael Jordan’s retired North Carolina jersey was seized. This is Errol Morris’s second of six shorts for ESPN Films, about the heights a few stupid fans were willing to climb to stoke the flames of a storied rivalry.


You can find It's Not Crazy, It's Sports: The Heist on the ESPN web site at http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=12394742 .

Saturday, March 07, 2015

The Caine Mutiny

With Sharon gone for the weekend at the retreat, I watched The Caine Mutiny as an HD rental on the AppleTV. Jack wandered in and watched the last 45 minutes. The 1954 film is based on the 1951 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name by Herman Wouk. I finished reading the book last week. The movie depicts a mutiny aboard a fictitious World War II U.S. Navy destroyer minesweeper, the USS Caine (DMS-18), and the subsequent court-martial of two officers.

The film received Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Best Actor (Humphrey Bogart), Best Supporting Actor (Tom Tully), Best Screenplay, Best Sound Recording (John P. Livadary), Best Film Editing, and Best Dramatic Score (Max Steiner). It didn't win in any category. Marlon Brando won the Best Actor Award for On the Waterfront, while On the Waterfront won Best Picture. The Caine Mutiny was the second highest-grossing film in the United States in 1954.

In order to get the movie down to two hours, the director cut 50 pages from the screenplay. Without this cut, it would have been a three to four hour movie. The end result is that the film doesn't provide much backstory for characters. The plot focuses on a few events leading up to the mutiny, the mutiny and the trial.

The movie was mildly entertaining, but it doesn't do the book justice. The book is really a story of the metamorphosis of Willie Keith, not a story about the mutiny and the trial. The book does a great job of painting a picture of Keith's relationships with his mother, father, girlfriend and fellow officers; all of this is really missing from the film. My recommendation is to read the book and then watch the movie as a curiosity.

Friday, March 06, 2015

El Retiro San Inigo 2015

Sharon and Janie are spending the weekend at El Retiro San Inigo, the Jesuit Retreat House of Los Altos. They are attending a silent retreat for members of the legal profession titled Converting Our Hearts: 32nd Annual Retreat for Members of the Legal Profession.

From 1994 to 2011, Sharon went to this retreat 17 out of 18 years, missing only the year after Jack was born. After missing 2012 and 2013, she got back on track last year.

Thursday, March 05, 2015

The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk

I finished reading The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk. Published in 1951, it won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. The novel grew out of Wouk's personal experiences aboard a destroyer-minesweeper in the Pacific in World War II.

I bought The Caine Mutiny as a ebook almost two years ago. At this point, I can't remember why I purchased it. Probably thirty years ago, I read Wouk's The Winds of War and War and Remembrance. I am guessing that something in the popular press triggered a connection between Herman Wouk and The Caine Mutiny.

The story is mostly told through the eyes of Willis Seward "Willie" Keith, an affluent, callow young man who signs up for midshipman school with the United States Navy to avoid being drafted into the Army during World War II. It follows Willie through his initial training to his assignment on the destroyer minesweeper USS Caine to the end of World War II. This experience transforms him into a very different person.

The mutiny in the title takes place during Typhoon Cobra. This was an actual tropical cyclone which struck the United States Pacific Fleet in December 1944 during World War II. Three destroyers capsized and sank during the storm. Nine other warships were damaged. Over 100 aircraft were wrecked or washed overboard. A total of 790 lives were lost.

The book was not what I expected. I thought that it was going to focus on the mutiny and resulting trial. The mutiny and the trial are really only part of the story. The story is a sweeping look at one person's experiences during World War II. Once I got into the book, I was hooked. I enjoyed it a great deal! I highly recommend it.

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Touring the new Willits Hospital

I spent the day touring the new Frank R. Howard Memorial Hospital being built in Willits.

The hospital is named for the son of Charles Howard. Howard made his fortune as an automobile dealer and became a prominent thoroughbred racehorse owner. He was dubbed one of the most successful Buick salesmen of all time.

Charles Howard was the owner of Seabiscuit! At the end of Seabiscuit's successful racing career in 1940, he was put out to stud at Howard's Ridgewood Ranch in Willits. Seabiscuit was finally laid to rest on the property in 1947.

From a technical standpoint, I was interested in the density of the APs for the wireless network. Standing on the patient floor, it was interesting how many APs you could see; the density is very high...